INTERIOR/EXTERIOR

IN STRINDBERG'S ROOMS

MILAVIDA

SPEAKING HOUSE

CAMERA OBSCURA WORKS

LIKE A BREATH IN LIGHT

PINHOLE
t e x t
b o o k

HERBARIUM

I AM #1

I AM #2

INNER LANDSCAPES

PRINTS

 

PINHOLE PHOTOGRAPHS

I discovered pinhole photography and the world of the slow light recorders in the later 1980s.
However, it was after participating in a pinhole photography workshop by the American photographer Sandy Moss in1988 that for several years I fell to working with this lensless method.

Pinhole cameras made possible a novel presentation of the grey zone in the midst of the daily routine, those things in it which had become invisible or taken for granted, but also the presence of nature, which so far had remained silent for my cameras.

Because the pinhole camera is the simplest application of the camera obscura phenomenon in photography, it is possible to build the camera oneself from almost any non-translucent material or object. The very process of building the camera serves to revitalize the thought processes and senses and is a temptation to break with photographic routines.
There is no viewfinder in pinhole cameras, so there is no need when photographing to place the camera between the photographer and the world. Using no lens implies long exposure times. During these the photographer is in the role of assistant for light tasked with helping the surrounding world to imprint itself on the light-sensitive surface inside the dark box. Pinhole cameras are unpredictable tools and the end result is always a surprise.

Over the years I have built innumerable pinhole cameras. The one I have used most is a red, wooden camera with which I photographed from 1989 to 1993 using roll film.
 I explored the hazy interface between me and the world and plotted the reference points of my existence.





Wooden pinhole camera with 6x7 film cassette. Designed by Petri Nuutinen.